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March 4, 2010: Salmonella Tennessee Identified in a Processed Food Ingredient

FDA taking steps to instruct industry and protect consumers

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Salmonella Tennessee Identified in a Processed Food Ingredient
FDA taking steps to instruct industry and protect consumers

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is taking steps to protect the public following the early identification of Salmonella Tennessee in one company’s supply of hydrolyzed vegetable protein (HVP). This is a common ingredient used most frequently as a flavor enhancer in many processed foods, including soups, sauces, chilis, stews, hot dogs, gravies, seasoned snack foods, dips and dressings.

In coordination with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, other federal agencies, and state health departments, FDA is closely monitoring and assessing the potential risks of illness from affected products.

“Our investigators were able to identify this problem before any illnesses occurred," said FDA commissioner Dr. Margaret A. Hamburg. "While the investigation is continuing, the agency is supporting reasonable steps to continue to protect the public health.”

The manufacturer of the affected product is Basic Food Flavors Inc in Las Vegas, Nevada. Only HVP manufactured by Basic Food Flavors is involved in this recall. The FDA conducted an investigation at the facility after a customer of Basic Food
Flavors reported finding Salmonella Tennessee in one production lot of HVP to the new FDA Reportable Food Registry.

FDA collected and analyzed samples at the facility and confirmed the presence of Salmonella Tennessee in the company’s processing equipment. The company is recalling all hydrolyzed vegetable protein in powder and paste form that it has produced since Sept. 17, 2009. 

“This situation clearly underscores the need for new food safety legislation to equip FDA with the tools we need to prevent contamination," said Dr. Jeff Farrar, associate commissioner for food protection, FDA’s Office of Foods.

At this time, there are no known illnesses associated with this contamination.

At this time, FDA is taking several steps to instruct industry and protect consumers from potential Salmonella infection.

FDA is advising industry that the recalled bulk HVP product should be destroyed or reconditioned according to FDA-approved procedures. FDA is also recommending recalls of certain products that might be eaten by consumers without any processing or
cooking steps to address the potential risk. FDA is recommending that consumers should:

  • Check www.foodsafety.gov1 for a list of recalled products;
  • Remember to follow cooking instructions for all foods.
  • Report symptoms of Salmonella or other food-related illness to your local
    health care professional.

For more information on the basics on Salmonella (such as sources, symptoms, duration of illness):

The previous announcement was posted on the FDA website on this date.

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