NEWS ARCHIVES
July 14, 2007: Taste of Chicago Salmonella Victims Reach 378

Chicago health officials said the number of people sickened after eating at the Pars Cove booth at the Taste of Chicago food festival has reached 378. Thirty-two of the cases have been confirmed as Salmonella food poisoning, and 12 people have been hospitalized, including an 18-month-old.  

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If you or a family member has suffered from food poisoning,
and you have a question about your legal rights,you can request a free case evaluation from our firm by clicking on Free Case Evaluation.

Although the food source responsible for this latest Salmonella outbreak has not been confirmed, health officials are focusing on an herb, cucumber, and tomato salad that was served with humus. On Friday, the Chicago health department told Pars Cove to stop serving hummus in their city restaurant. 

On Friday, the Chicago Health Department was overwhelmed by phone calls. Employees from other departments were recruited to serve as operators. Health officials have said they will contact those individuals on their callback list. 

If you believe that you are suffering from Salmonella food poisoning, you should contact your doctor. Even if you have recovered, you should also contact the Chicago Health Department, since they are responsible for conducting the outbreak investigation.  Chicago residents can call the Health Department hotline at 311 to report an illness or to ask questions. Non-residents should contact the department at 312-744-5000. 

The Law Firm of Eric H. Weinberg is already assisting individuals who believe they were victims of this current Salmonella outbreak. We also represent clients nationwide who have been victims of the recent Arby’s, Peter Pan brand peanut butter, and Veggie Booty Salmonella outbreaks. If you or a loved one has been a victim of  Salmonella food poisoning, and you need legal help, please click on free case evaluation, or call us toll free at 1-877-934-6274. To learn more about Salmonella click on About Salmonella and Salmonella Symptoms and Complications.

July 14, 2007: Alabama Outbreak Slowing

After two more cases of E. coli food poisoning were identified on Thursday, no new cases came forward on Friday, according to the Huntsville-Madison County Health Department in Alabama. 

A total of 18 individuals who ate at Little Rosie’s Taqueria from June 27 through June 30 have confirmed cases of E. coli food poisoning. Three people have been hospitalized, including a 5-year-old and a 70-year-old. The condition of a 48-year-old woman with hemolytic uremic syndrome, a complication of E. coli infection, has been upgraded from critical to serious. 

Health officials have said that the source of the E. coli contamination is shredded lettuce. They have also said that it is safe to eat at the restaurant at present. Symptoms of E. coli food poisoning include severe abdominal cramps and watery diarrhea. The diarrhea may become bloody and can lead to dehydration. 

The Law Firm of Eric H. Weinberg currently represents victims of food poisoning outbreaks throughout the United States. If you or a loved one have been harmed by E. coli food poisoning, and you have a question about your legal rights, please call us toll free at 1-877-934-6274 for a free case evaluation, or click on free case evaluation to submit your questions. For more information about E. coli, visit the pages of this website and the blog www.ecolilawsuit.com. To learn more about the Law Firm of Eric H. Weinberg, please visit www.erichweinberg.com.

July 13, 2007: Number of Salmonella Food Poisoning Cases from Taste of Chicago Reaches 126

The Chicago Health Department now has reports of 126 cases of Salmonella poisoning linked with food consumed at the Taste of Chicago food festival. The city's help line has been flooded with calls since news of the outbreak began to spread midweek.

Ten people have been hospitalized with the illness, and nine of the 126 cases have been confirmed by laboratory tests as Salmonella food poisoning. Most of the 126 cases are individuals who live in Chicago, but food festival visitors from Illinois and other states are included in the total. 

The 126 people have one thing in common: all ate at the Pars Cove Persian Cuisine Booth at Taste of Chicago. The specific food source of the contamination is not yet known, but health officials are investigating the cucumber hummus dish. 

With the investigation into the outbreak ongoing, anyone who thinks they may have become ill after eating at the Pars Cove booth should contact the Chicago Board of Health at (312) 744-5000. Chicago residents can call 311. Symptoms of Salmonella food poisoning may include diarrhea, abdominal cramps, nausea, vomiting and fever. 

If you require legal representation after suffering Salmonella food poisoning, please call the Law Firm of Eric H. Weinberg toll free at 1-877-934-6274, or click on free case evaluation. For more information about the firm, which currently represents victims of Salmonella outbreaks connected with Arby’s Restaurant and Peter Pan and Great Value peanut butter, visit www.erichweinberg.com. To learn more about Salmonella, please click on Salmonella Food Poisoning or visit the blog www.salmonellalawsuit.com, also sponsored by Eric H. Weinberg.

July 12, 2007: Salmonella Outbreak Linked to Chicago Food Festival

According to local health officials, 17 individuals reporting cases of food poisoning have one thing in common - they all ate at the Pars Cove Restaurant booth at the Taste of Chicago food festival. Of the 17, five cases have been linked to Salmonella bacteria; three of those individuals were hospitalized.

The Chicago Department of Health is investigating the outbreak. The type of Salmonella bacteria has been identified as the Heidelberg strain, but the specific contaminated food served at the Pars Cove booth has not been determined. 

Health Department inspectors patrol the food festival, examining each of the 70 booths. But their job is to measure the temperature of the food and dispose of anything that doesn’t meet code, officials noted. Apparently, inspectors disposed of food being served at the Pars Cove booth at least once over the course of the festival. 

The restaurant, which serves Persian food and is located on the North Side of the city, has been in business for 31 years. Health officials inspected the restaurant in the past few days and found a number of violations, including unsanitary conditions, improper refrigeration and mouse droppings, according to Frances Guichard, director of food protection for the Chicago Department of Public Health. The restaurant, which has been fined for the mouse droppings, remains open. 

If you are experiencing symptoms of Salmonella food poisoning, including diarrhea, abdominal cramps, nausea and/or fever, you should contact your doctor and the Chicago Board of Health at (312) 744-5000. Chicago residents can call 311. If you have gotten sick after eating at the Pars Cove booth, you can assist the city health department in its investigation by getting in touch. 

If you require legal representation after suffering Salmonella food poisoning, please call the Law Firm of Eric H. Weinberg toll free at 1-877-934-6274, or click on free case evaluation. Our firm currently represents victims of Salmonella outbreaks connected with Arby’s Restaurant and Peter Pan and Great Value peanut butter. To learn more about Salmonella, please click on Salmonella Food Poisoning..

July 11, 2007: E.coli in Jail

Over 70 inmates at the Jefferson County Jail in Colorado have been made ill by exposure to E. coli bacteria. Shiga toxin-producing E. coli has been identified in tested samples, but the specific strain of E. coli has not yet been determined. 

The first inmates became ill with intestinal symptoms on June 6. A total of nine inmates were sent to the hospital, and one is still hospitalized. Thirty-seven inmates are still sick. 

The source of the E. coli contamination has not been found, but officials with the Jefferson County Department of Health and Environment are continuing to investigate. The food supplier to the jail, and kitchen workers there, are being questioned, and food is being tested as part of the investigation. 

Symptoms of E. coli food poisoning may include abdominal cramps and watery diarrhea. The diarrhea may become bloody, and can lead to dehydration. Fever may or may not be present. Sometimes there are no symptoms at all. Symptoms usually resolve in 5-10 days. 

The Law Firm of Eric H. Weinberg currently represents victims of food poisoning outbreaks throughout the United States. If you or a loved one have been harmed by E. coli food poisoning, and you have a question about your legal rights, please call us toll free at 1-877-934-6274 for a free case evaluation, or click on free case evaluation to submit your questions. For more information about E. coli, visit the pages of this website and the blog www.ecolilawsuit.com. To learn more about the Law Firm of Eric H. Weinberg, please visit www.erichweinberg.com.

July 11, 2007: Shredded Lettuce Linked to Little Rosie's E.coli Outbreak

The Huntsville-Madison County Health Department reports that shredded lettuce, contaminated with E. coli, is most likely to blame for the food poisoning outbreak that has been linked to the Huntsville restaurant, Little Rosie’s Taqueria.  Little Rosie’s is located on Whitesburg Drive. 

According to Dr. Debra Williams, assistant medical director for the county health department, 14 of the 15 patients who have tested positive for E. coli O157:H7 ate at Little Rosie’s, on either June 28 or 29th.  The first food poisoning cases associated with the outbreak were reported to the health department on July 4th. 

Three other individuals who ate at Little Rosie’s, and are now showing symptoms of E. coli food poisoning have been tested.  Health officials are awaiting the results. 

It has also been reported that three of the patients have developed Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS), and are undergoing dialysis.  Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome, a serious complication of E. coli food poisoning, may occur in about 2%-7% of cases. 

The Law Firm of Eric H. Weinberg currently represents victims of food poisoning outbreaks throughout the United States. For a free case evaluation, please call us toll free at 1-877-934-6274, or click on free case evaluation. To learn more about E. coli food poisoning, please click here

July 10, 2007: More Confirmed Cases of E.coli in Huntsville, Alabama

According to Dr. Debra Williams of the Madison County Health Department in Alabama, eight more individuals have tested positive for E.coli, bringing the total to 14 confirmed cases.

Dr. Williams also indicated that while the exact source of the bacteria has not been determined, most of the patients had eaten at Little Rosie's Taqueria on Whitesburg Drive in Huntsville in late June. 

Initial symptoms of E. coli food poisoning may include abdominal cramps and watery diarrhea. The diarrhea may become bloody, and can lead to dehydration. Fever may or may not be present. Sometimes there are no symptoms at all. Symptoms usually resolve in 5-10 days. 

Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS), a serious complication of E. coli infection, may occur in about 2%-7% of cases. HUS is characterized by destruction of red blood cells, damage to the lining of blood vessel walls, and, in severe cases, kidney failure. Children and the elderly are at greatest risk for developing HUS. 

The Law Firm of Eric H. Weinberg currently represents victims of food poisoning outbreaks throughout the United States. If you or a loved one have been harmed by E. coli food poisoning, and you have a question about your legal rights, please call us toll free at 1-877-934-6274 for a free case evaluation, or click on free case evaluation to submit your questions. To learn more about the Law Firm of Eric H. Weinberg, please visit www.erichweinberg.com.

July 9, 2007: Six Confirmed E.coli Cases in Madison County, Alabama

Public health officials are currently investigating an outbreak of E.coli in Madison County, Alabama. Six cases have been confirmed; however, the source of the outbreak has not yet been identified.

According to WAFF television in Huntsville, all of the cases were reported on July 4th. Doctor Debra Williams, an assistant health officer with the county health department, said test results returned Friday confirmed the presence of the bacteria, and that more cases could surface. 

Symptoms of E. coli food poisoning may include diarrhea (sometimes bloody), fever, nausea, and abdominal cramps. Young children, the elderly, and individuals with weakened immune systems are at greatest risk of suffering complications associated with E. coli infection. 

E. coli is most often associated with eating undercooked, contaminated ground beef. Since E. coli can be found in the intestines of healthy cattle, meat can become contaminated during slaughter. Other sources of infection include the consumption of non-pasteurized milk and juice, sprouts, and leafy greens such as lettuce and spinach. Swimming in sewage-contaminated lakes and pools or drinking inadequately chlorinated water are other sources of infection. 

The Law Firm of Eric H. Weinberg currently represents victims of food poisoning outbreaks throughout the United States. If you or a loved one have been harmed by E. coli food poisoning, and you have a question about your legal rights, please call us toll free at 1-877-934-6274 for a free case evaluation, or click on free case evaluation to submit your questions. For more information about E. coli, visit the pages of this website and the blog www.ecolilawsuit.com. To learn more about the Law Firm of Eric H. Weinberg, please visit www.erichweinberg.com.

June 28, 2007: Veggie Booty Snack Food Recalled After 51 Reported Cases of Salmonella

All Veggie Booty snack foods are being recalled nationwide after 51 cases of Salmonella food poisoning were reported in 17 states. The illness has mainly struck children under the age of 3, according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

The recall was initiated by Robert’s American Gourmet Food Inc., manufacturer of Veggie Booty, after the company was informed by the FDA of possible Salmonella contamination of their product. According to the FDA, many of those taken ill had consumed Veggie Booty. 

Georgine Hertzwig of Robert's American Gourmet, based in Sea Cliff, NY, said that the product had not tested positive for Salmonella, but that the recall had been undertaken as a precaution given the FDA findings. 

Veggie Booty is sold in many grocery outlets, including supermarkets and health food stores, throughout the U.S. and Canada. It is also available on-line and by mail order. All bag sizes, codes and expiration dates are subject to the recall. 

Symptoms of Salmonella food poisoning include diarrhea (sometimes bloody), abdominal cramps, nausea, vomiting, fever, chills, headache, muscle pain, and joint pain. 

The Law Firm of Eric H. Weinberg currently represents victims of food poisoning outbreaks throughout the United States. If you or a loved one has been harmed by Salmonella food poisoning, and you have a question about your legal rights, please call us toll free at 1-877-934-6274 for a free case evaluation, or click free case evaluation to submit your question. You may also visit www.erichweinberg.com to learn more about the Law Firm of Eric H. Weinberg. For more information about Salmonella and other types of food poisoning, please visit the pages of this website and the blog www.salmonellalawsuit.com.

June 28, 2007: California Farm Possible Link to Listeria Contamination  of Trader Joe's Onions

Jack Bros. farm, located in Brawley, California, may be the source of the Listeria contamination that caused the recall of over 20 tons of onions sold under the Trader Joe’s name. The recall was initiated on June 20 after the Washington State Department of Agriculture found evidence of the bacteria in a bag of diced yellow onions. 

Jack Bros. grows 800 acres of onions for Gills Onions LLC of California. The onions are distributed under the Gills and Trader Joe’s brand names. Investigators have not identified the source of the contaminated onions, and no illnesses have been reported to authorities thus far. 

The recalled onions were being sold in 10-ounce bags with the Trader Joe’s brand name in stores in Arizona, California, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon and Washington. The bags carried the lot number 2017-R and a “best if used by” date of June16, 2007. 

Symptoms of illness resulting from Listeria food poisoning include fever, muscle aches, and, occasionally, nausea or diarrhea. If infection spreads to the nervous system, symptoms such as headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance, or convulsions can occur. The disease affects primarily pregnant women, newborns, the elderly, and adults with weakened immune systems. Signs of illness typically appear from 3- 4 weeks following the consumption of contaminated food. However, symptoms can develop from one week to 90 days after exposure. 

The Law Firm of Eric H. Weinberg currently represents victims of food poisoning outbreaks throughout the United States. If you or a loved one has been harmed by Listeria food poisoning, and you have a question about your legal rights, please call us toll free at 1-877-934-6274 for a free case evaluation, or click free case evaluation to submit your question. You may also visit www.erichweinberg.com to learn more about the Law Firm of Eric H. Weinberg.

June 26, 2007: E.coli Infection Hospitalizes Two Vermont Children

Two children from the central Vermont communities of Randolph and Barre Town are being treated in separate Boston hospitals for kidney failure, resulting as a complication of E.coli infections. Presently, health officials believe that the cases are unrelated.

As reported by David Delcore in the Times Argus, the five-year-old Barre Town girl and the three-year-old Randolph girl are on dialysis after being diagnosed with hemolytic uremic syndrome, or HUS.  HUS is a rare but life-threatening complication of E. coli infection, characterized by kidney failure and destruction of red blood cells.  HUS is most commonly associated with a specific strain of E. coli, known as O157:H7.  Children and the elderly are the most susceptible to complications resulting from an E. coli infection.

According to Vermont State Epidemiologist Patricia Tassler, the severity of the two cases reported this month is unusual, and that preliminary investigations have not pinpointed the source of what appears to be two unrelated infections.

E. coli is most often associated with eating undercooked, contaminated ground beef. Since E. coli can be found in the intestines of healthy cattle, meat can become contaminated during slaughter. Other sources of infection include the consumption of non-pasteurized milk and juice, sprouts, leafy greens such as lettuce and spinach, and salami; swimming in sewage-contaminated lakes and pools; or drinking inadequately chlorinated water.

The Law Firm of Eric H. Weinberg currently represents victims of food poisoning outbreaks throughout the United States. If you or a loved one has been harmed by E. coli food poisoning, and you have a question about your legal rights, please call us toll free at 1-877-934-6274 for a free case evaluation, or click free case evaluation to submit your question.  You may also visit www.erichweinberg.com to learn more about the Law Firm of Eric H. Weinberg

June 18, 2007: Slaughtered Goat May Be Link To Recent E.coli Outbreak

Health officials recently learned that a goat had been slaughtered in the kitchen of Captain's Galley, the China Grove, NC, seafood restaurant recently linked to a deadly E.coli O157:H7 outbreak. The restaurant was closed on Monday.

Twenty-one people became ill after eating at the Captain’s Galley, and last week, 86 year-old Faye Sides died of complications related to E. coli infection.  Based on interviews with employees, health officials believe that the goat was slaughtered in the restaurant kitchen some time between May 11 and May 20.

Slaughtering, or bringing a live farm animal into a restaurant kitchen, posses a most serious health threat in that E. coli, a type of bacteria found in the intestines of healthy farm animals, could potentially contaminate food, or work surfaces and utensils.  Restaurant workers practicing poor hand washing habits could also pass E. coli to unsuspecting restaurant patrons.

According to Rowan County Health Director Leonard Wood, restaurant patrons became ill between May 26 and June 3.  The E. coli outbreak was announced by health officials on June 7. To date there has been a total of eight confirmed cases and 13 suspected cases.

The Law Firm of Eric H. Weinberg currently represents victims of food poisoning outbreaks in North Carolina and throughout the United States. If you or a loved one have been harmed by  E. coli food poisoning, and you have a question about your legal rights, please call us toll free at 1-877-934-6274 for a free case evaluation, or click free case evaluation to submit your question.

June 4, 2007: Almost 200 More Cases of Salmonella Food Poisoning Linked To Peanut Butter

In its most recent update, the U. S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) increased the total number of people affected by Salmonella food poisoning linked with peanut butter by almost 200 over the total provided by the agency in March.

According to the June 1 CDC report, 628 people residing in 47 states contracted this foodborne illness. Individuals from 2 months to 95 years old were affected. While 20% of those who became ill were hospitalized, no deaths have been reported. Also according to the CDC, investigation into the cause of the food poisoning outbreak is ongoing. 

Salmonella has been linked with Peter Pan and Great Value peanut butter produced by ConAgra at a plant in Sylvester, Georgia. ConAgra has said that moisture resulting from a leaky roof and faulty sprinkler system at the plant created conditions in which bacteria could grow. Peter Pan and Great Value peanut butter have been recalled since February. 

Symptoms of Salmonella food poisoning include diarrhea (sometimes bloody), abdominal cramps, nausea, vomiting, fever, chills, headache, muscle pain, and joint pain. 

To learn more about Salmonella food poisoning, please visit the pages of this website  and the blog www.salmonellalawsuit.com. Both sites are sponsored by the Law Firm of Eric H. Weinberg and provide up-to-date information regarding food poisoning outbreaks.

May 30, 2007: E.coli Outbreak in Fresno Possibly Linked to Meat

Half a dozen people visited a Fresno hospital last week with symptoms of E. coli food poisoning, and county health officials are investigating a link to meat that was consumed at a private party on May 19 by five of the six individuals affected. 

The investigation by the Fresno County Health Department has not resulted in voluntary or mandatory recalls. Fresno County Health Officer Ed Moreno said that public health does not appear to be at risk at this time. 

Moreno also said that health officials have inspected the Meat Market in north Fresno, since meat from that location was purchased for the three private parties that health officials are concentrating on in their E. coli investigation. 

The six individuals with E. coli food poisoning range in age from toddlers to older adults, and tests have shown that they had a strain of E. coli O157. 

Initial symptoms of E.coli O157:H7 infection include severe abdominal cramps and watery diarrhea. The diarrhea may become bloody and can lead to dehydration. Sometimes there are no symptoms at all. There is usually little or no fever. Symptoms generally resolve in 5-10 days, but serious complications may ensue. Children and the elderly are at greatest risk of developing complications. 

If you or a loved one has been harmed by E. coli food poisoning, please fill out a free case evaluation or contact us toll-free at 1-877-934-6274. For more information about E. coli food poisoning, visit the pages of this website and the blog  www.ecolilawsuit.com.

May 17, 2007: Ground Beef Purchased From Lunds or Byerly's Grocery Stores In Minnesota Possibly Contaminated With E.coli O157:H7

According to the USDA, PM Holdings, a Minnesota meat packer, is voluntary recalling 117,500 pounds of beef trim products after seven cases of E.coli food poisoning were reported in Minnesota.

The seven cases include two children and five adults, according to the Minnesota Health Department. All of the individuals became ill after they had eaten ground beef purchased after April 12 from the following stores: Byerly’s St. Louis Park, Byerly’s Minnetonka, Byerly’s Chanhassen and Lunds Edina. 

The beef trim recall concerns meat that was produced on March 27 and then shipped to distributors and retail outlets in Arizona, Illinois, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, Virginia and Wisconsin. The beef trim was processed into ground beef. 

Initial symptoms of E.coli O157:H7 infection include severe abdominal cramps and watery diarrhea. The diarrhea may become bloody and can lead to dehydration. Sometimes there are no symptoms at all. There is usually little or no fever. Symptoms generally resolve in 5-10 days, but serious complications may ensue. Children and the elderly are at greatest risk of developing complications. 

If you or a loved one has been harmed by E. coli food poisoning, please fill out a free case evaluation or contact us toll-free at 1-877-934-6274. For more information about E. coli food poisoning, visit the pages of this website and the blog  www.ecolilawsuit.com.

May 16, 2007: 129,000 Pounds of Beef With Suspected E.coli Contamination Recalled by Michigan Company

Earlier in the week, the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced the voluntary recall of beef produced in Michigan and shipped to 15 states. When E. coli O157:H7 contamination was suspected, Davis Creek Meats and Seafood of Kalamazoo initiated the recall. 

At the end of April, two confirmed cases of E. coli food poisoning reached the Michigan Department of Community Health. An investigation of the cases led to Davis Creek and beef that had been produced by the company between March 1 and April 30. 

The beef products include mechanically tenderized steaks and ground beef. Labels on product boxes have the establishment number “Est. 1947A” and a date code falling between “060” and “120.” 

For a complete list of recalled products, see the FSIS recall release at http://www.fsis.usda.gov/PDF/Recall_023_2007_Release.pdf

Initial symptoms of E.coli O157:H7 infection include severe abdominal cramps and watery diarrhea. The diarrhea may become bloody and can lead to dehydration. Sometimes there are no symptoms at all. There is usually little or no fever. Symptoms generally resolve in 5-10 days, but serious complications may ensue. Children and the elderly are at greatest risk of developing complications. 

If you or a loved one has been harmed by E. coli food poisoning, please fill out a free case evaluation or contact us toll-free at 1-877-934-6274. For more information about E. coli food poisoning, visit the pages of this website and the blog  www.ecolilawsuit.com.

May 3, 2007: Minnesota Pizza Restaurant Closed After Possible Hepatitis A Exposure

On May 1, the Pizza Ranch restaurant in Slayton, Minnesota, voluntarily closed after two food workers were found to have Hepatitis A. The Minnesota Department of Health is investigating whether other restaurant employees or any customers have contracted the disease. Individuals may have been exposed to Hepatitis A if they ate at the restaurant between April 9 and May 1, Pizza Ranch serves from 800 to 1,000 meals a week.

Hepatitis A is a disease of the liver caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). The illness is characterized by a sudden onset of fever, tiredness, nausea, loss of appetite, and abdominal discomfort, followed in several days by jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes). 

On average, hepatitis A symptoms appear 28 days (with a range of 15–50 days) following exposure to the virus. Symptoms usually last less than 2 months, although a small number of individuals may remain ill for as long as 6 months. Adults are more likely to have symptoms than children, and some infected individuals may not have any signs or symptoms of the illness. 

If you or a loved one has been harmed by hepatitis A food poisoning, please fill out a free case evaluation or contact us toll-free at 1-877-934-6274. For more information about hepatitis A, visit the pages of this website.

April 22, 2007: Pennsylvania Steakhouse Linked with E.coli Food Poisoning Outbreak

Five people who ate at Hoss's Steak and Sea House restaurants in Pennsylvania between March 24 and 29 were stricken with E.coli food poisoning. Four of the individuals were hospitalized. The five diners had ordered steak cooked rare or medium-rare. The restaurant chain remains open, though according to a Hoss spokesman, the supply of steaks is limited.

As a result of the food poisoning episode, HFX Corp. of South Claysburg, Pennsylvania, has launched a voluntary recall of 259,230 pounds of beef. HFX is the meat processing facility affiliated with Hoss restaurants and supplies beef to other restaurants in Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia, as well as to wholesalers. 

A spokesman for the Pennsylvania Health Department, Richard McGarvey, said that E. coli contamination isn’t usually an issue with steaks, since the bacteria is killed when the steak’s surface is grilled. In the Hoss cases, E. coli may have been transferred from the surface to the inside of the steak when the beef was injected with tenderizers and flavor enhancers, he said. 

Initial symptoms of E.coli O157:H7 infection include severe abdominal cramps and watery diarrhea. The diarrhea may become bloody and can lead to dehydration. Sometimes there are no symptoms at all. There is usually little or no fever. Symptoms generally resolve in 5-10 days, but serious complications may ensue. Children and the elderly are at greatest risk of developing complications. 

If you or a loved one has been harmed by the E. coli food poisoning, please fill out a free case evaluation or contact us toll-free at 1-877-934-6274. For more information about E. coli food poisoning, visit the pages of this website and the blog  www.ecolilawsuit.com

April 22, 2007: Over 100,000 Pounds of Frozen Ground Beef Recalled by California Company

After three children living in Napa County, California, became ill with E. coli food poisoning after eating hamburgers, Richwood Meat Company voluntarily recalled 107,943 pounds of frozen ground beef. 

The three food poisoning cases were reported on April 3 and 4. The children had eaten the hamburgers at two Little League concession stands. California health officials have identified E. coli in tested samples of recalled hamburgers. 

The recalled hamburgers and other frozen ground beef products were distributed in Arizona, California, Idaho, Oregon and Washington under the brand names Fireriver, Chef’s Pride, Ritz Food, Blackwood Farms, California Pacific Associates, C&C Distributing, Golbon and Richwood. 

Consumers are urged to dispose of any ground beef products that are subject to recall. These products contain the establishment number EST. 8264 and a date code of 118-6 or 4/28/06. 

Initial symptoms of E.coli O157:H7 infection include severe abdominal cramps and watery diarrhea. The diarrhea may become bloody and can lead to dehydration. Sometimes there are no symptoms at all. There is usually little or no fever. Symptoms generally resolve in 5-10 days, but serious complications may ensue. Children and the elderly are at greatest risk of developing complications. 

If you or a loved one has been harmed by the E. coli food poisoning, please fill out a free case evaluation or contact us toll-free at 1-877-934-6274. For more information about E. coli food poisoning, visit the pages of this website and the blog  www.ecolilawsuit.com.

April 10, 2007: Georgia Lawyer Visits Peanut Butter Plant

Yesterday, attorney Andrew Childers of Atlanta visited the Georgia plant connected with the Salmonella outbreak associated with the Peter Pan peanut butter that first made headlines last February and sickened thousands of people. A group composed of plaintiffs' attorneys, engineers, mapping specialists, photographers and videographers examined the ConAgra plant located in Sylvester, Georgia.

Mr. Childers, of Childers, Buck, & Schlueter, LLP, along with Eric H. Weinberg of the Law Offices of Eric H. Weinberg in New Brunswick, NJ, represents hundreds of individuals who were affected by contaminated Peter Pan and Great Value peanut butter. The two attorneys are the only ones to have filed a peanut butter case in state court in Georgia, where the plant is located. 

In addition, Childers and Weinberg are consulting with a retired FDA inspector to make sure that they glean all the information possible from on-site investigations of the manufacturing facility. 

“We'll be back at the plant this Friday to continue our investigation,” Mr. Childers said. “Our efforts are aimed at forcing ConAgra to disclose all of the information in its possession relating to how and when Salmonella bacteria got into the peanut butter. So far they have refused to turn over any information as to how or why the plant was infected. We will continue to press them until we get what we are entitled to.” 

ConAgra has blamed a leaky roof and malfunctioning sprinkler system for the outbreak, explaining that moisture in the plant created an environment in which dormant Salmonella bacteria could grow. The pathogen may have been present in raw peanuts and peanut dust in the plant. How the Salmonella came in contact with the peanut butter before packaging is not yet known. 

If you or a loved one has been harmed by the Salmonella peanut butter outbreak, please fill out a free case evaluation or contact us toll-free at 1-877-934-6274.

April 10, 2007: Souplantation Restaurant Closed Because of E.coli Outbreak

Orange County, California, health officials closed the Souplantation restaurant in Lake Forest on Saturday after the total number of individuals affected by an E. coli outbreak connected with the restaurant reached 14. That number includes 12 customers and one restaurant employee, a busboy. 

The most recent customer identified ate at the restaurant on March 25, while others affected had eaten there on March 23 or 24. The source of the E. coli has not been determined. 

Of the 14 people who have tested positive for the pathogen, two were hospitalized and released, and one – a 12-year-old girl – is still at Children's Hospital of Orange County, though reportedly in good condition. 

According to Howard Sutter, a spokesman for the Orange County Health Care Agency, closing the restaurant makes it possible for the agency to closely monitor its reopening through a rigid inspection. 

If you or a loved one has been harmed by this E. coli outbreak, please fill out a free case evaluation or contact us toll-free at 1-877-934-6274. For more information about E. coli food poisoning and your legal rights, please visit the pages of this website as well as www.erichweinberg.com.

April 6, 2007: Total of 10 E.coli Cases Linked with Souplantation Restaurant in California

Three more cases of E.coli food poisoning were confirmed yesterday, bringing the total number of food poisoning cases linked with Souplantation restaurant in Lake Forest, California, to 10.

The Orange County Health Agency has confirmed that the 10 individuals ate at the same Souplantation restaurant on March 23 or 24. A 12-year-old girl, identified among the first seven cases, is in intensive care at Children’s Hospital of Orange County. The health agency also confirmed that the seven individuals tested had the same strain of E. coli bacteria, but that the source of the contamination had not been discovered.  

Souplantation is a serve-yourself, salad buffet restaurant. Anyone experiencing symptoms of E. coli food poisoning who has eaten at the Souplantation in Lake Forest is asked to contact their healthcare professional and the county health department. 

For more information about E. coli food poisoning and your legal rights, please visit the pages of this website as well as www.erichweinberg.com.

April 6, 2007: Source of Salmonella Contamination in Peter Pan and Great Value Peanut Butter Uncovered by Investigation

According to ConAgra Foods, makers of the Peter Pan and Great Value peanut butter that caused Salmonella food poisoning in hundreds of consumers, moisture coming from a leaky roof and a faulty sprinkler created conditions in which the bacteria could grow. 

After two months of investigation, ConAgra determined that a roof leak during a rainstorm and a faulty sprinkler that had caused the indoor sprinkler system to go off twice created enough moisture for dormant Salmonella bacteria to grow. The bacteria probably originated from raw peanuts and peanut dust. 

ConAgra spokeswoman Stephanie Childs said that the peanut butter facility in question, located in Georgia, had been cleaned thoroughly after each water incident, but that the Salmonella had survived and come in contact with the peanut butter before packaging. How that contact occurred is not known. 

Approximately 425 individuals from 44 different states were harmed by consuming Peter Pan or Great Value peanut butter. Consumers became ill between August 1, 2006, and February 16, 2007, with the majority falling ill after December 1, 2006. 

“We understand that inspectors have found the source of the Salmonella contamination in ConAgra's peanut butter factory,” said Eric H. Weinberg, one of a team of attorneys representing numerous victims of this food poisoning outbreak. “It would be sensible for the company to deal responsibly with the innocent customers who have suffered serious side effects from these contaminated foods."   

According to Childs, the Georgia facility is being redesigned and renovated and is scheduled to reopen in August. The redesign will create greater separation between raw peanuts and the finished product, she said. 

To learn more about the work being done by the Law Offices of Eric H. Weinberg on the Salmonella peanut butter food poisoning outbreak and in other areas of the law, please visit www.erichweinberg.com.

April 3, 2007: Health Officials Link E.coli Outbreak to Orange County Restaurant

Seven people who dined at the southern Orange County restaurant, Foothill Ranch Souplantation, have suffered E.coli  food poisoning, resulting in three hospitalizations. According to health officials the source of contamination has not yet been identified. The victims ate at the Foothill Ranch Souplantation, located on Towne Centre Drive in Lake Forest between March 23 and March 25.  

Initial symptoms of E. coli food poisoning may include severe abdominal cramps and watery diarrhea.  Diarrhea may become bloody and can lead to severe dehydration.  There is usually little or no fever.  Symptoms generally resolve in 5-10 days however, serious complications such as hemolytic uremic syndrome (a rare syndrome affecting the blood and kidneys) may ensue.  Children and the elderly are at the greatest risk for developing complications. 

If you think that you are experiencing symptoms related to E. coli infection, you should contact your health care provider or visit your local hospital emergency room. 

To learn more about E. coli and food poisoning, please visit the pages of this website.  If you believe that you or a loved one has been the victim of E. coli food poisoning and you would like to know more about your legal rights, please contact the Law Firm of Eric H. Weinberg toll free at 1-877-934-6274, or click here on free case evaluation.

March 24, 2007: Rat Poison Found in Contaminated Pet Food

New York state scientists found evidence of rat poison during tests of recalled pet food manufactured by Menu Foods of Canada. The company says they do not know how the pet food became contaminated.

Tests carried out at the New York State Animal Health Diagnostic Center of Cornell University and at the New York State Food Laboratory found a form of rat poison, or aminopterin, in wet cat food. Menu Foods has now expanded the recall to include all 95 brands of moist pet food, without regard to manufacturing dates. 

The president of Menu Foods, Paul Henderson, said that the while company does not know how rat poison got into the pet food, they do not think that tampering is to blame. Henderson also stated that the company would compensate both American and Canadian owners whose pets became ill or died from eating the contaminated food. Officials have said that owners who handle the pet food in question are not at risk.

March 20, 2007: Recalled Pet Food Still Under Investigation

The FDA and Menu Foods, Inc., are still investigating the cause of contamination in pet food manufactured by this company based in Ontario, Canada. Menu Foods has recalled dog and cat food produced at its facilities in Emporia, Kansas, and in New Jersey, between December 3, 2006 and March 6, 2007. 

The dog food in question is sold under 51 different brand names and the cat food under 40 brand names throughout North America. Some well-known brands, including Iams, Eukanuba and Science Diet, are included in the recall. Stores that sell the pet food include PetSmart, Safeway and Wal-Mart. 

Currently, a total of 14 dogs and cats have died as a result of eating the contaminated pet food, according to the FDA. These include animals that died after participating in Menu Foods taste tests, as well as pets. 

Wheat gluten is being investigated as a possible source of contamination, though the FDA is investigating other pet food ingredients as well. While the cause of death in the animals is not yet known, dogs and cats exhibited signs of kidney failure after consuming the contaminated food. 

The FDA is recommending that pets with signs of kidney failure (including loss of appetite, lethargy and vomiting) after consumption of the food in question be taken to the veterinarian. Pet owners can contact Menu Foods’ recall hotline at 1-866-895-2708, and FDA complaint coordinators can be contacted through the following website: http://www.fda.gov/opacom/backgrounders/complain.html.

March 17, 2007: Minnesota Warns of Possible Listeria Contamination in Potato Salad

In response to a Minnesota Department of Agriculture finding of possible Listeria contamination, Coborn's DBC Foods of St. Cloud, Minnesota, has voluntarily recalled potato salad that it manufactured. 

The contamination was found during a routine store inspection, according to Kevin Elfering, Director of the Dairy and Food Division of the Minnesota Department of Agriculture. While the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes has been identified, its origin has not been determined.

The potato salad under suspicion was sold under the Midwest Pride, Coborn's and Cash Wise labels in prepackaged, one-pound containers with lot number 7057018A. The expiration date for the Coborn’s and Cash Wise potato salads was March 9, while the expiration date for the Midwest Pride produce was April 2. 

In addition, deli-packed containers with lot codes 7057018A and 7057026B were sold between February 27 and March 16 in 89 stores in Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wisconsin, Iowa, Michigan, and Nebraska. 

To date, no illnesses resulting from Listeria contamination have been reported. Symptoms of the illness include fever, muscle aches, and, occasionally, nausea or diarrhea. If infection spreads to the nervous system, symptoms such as headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance, or convulsions can occur. The disease affects primarily pregnant women, newborns, the elderly, and adults with weakened immune systems. Signs of illness typically appear from 3- 4 weeks following the consumption of contaminated food. However, symptoms can develop from one week to 90 days after exposure to Listeria

To learn more about Listeria food poisoning, please visit the pages of this website. This site is sponsored by the Law Firm of Eric H. Weinberg and provides up-to-date information regarding food poisoning outbreaks.

March 10, 2007: Peanut Butter Recall Extended Back to 2004

The FDA announced on March 9 that ConAgra has extended the recall of Peter Pan and Great Value peanut butter to include products manufactured as early as October 2004. The earlier peanut butter recall voluntarily issued by ConAgra and based on a presumed link to Salmonella food poisoning dated back to December 2005.

Consumers should look for jars of the two brands of peanut butter with a product code beginning with 2111. Because peanut butter’s shelf life is long, individuals still may have in their possession peanut butter manufactured at any time after October 2004. 

The FDA said that the expanded recall was part of its ongoing investigation of the Salmonella outbreak linked with Peter Pan and Great Value peanut butter manufactured at ConAgra’s Georgia plant. 

Symptoms of Salmonella food poisoning include diarrhea (sometimes bloody), abdominal cramps, nausea, vomiting, fever, chills, headache, muscle pain, and joint pain. 

To learn more about Salmonella food poisoning, please visit the pages of this website  and the blog www.salmonellalawsuit.com. Both sites are sponsored by the Law Firm of Eric H. Weinberg and provide up-to-date information regarding food poisoning outbreaks.  If you believe that you are a victim of the recent Peter Pan brand peanut butter outbreak, and you have a question about you legal rights, you can request a free case evaluation from our firm, or call us toll free at 1-877-934-6274

March 9, 2007: Update On Peanut Butter Salmonella Outbreak

On March 7 the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued its "last planned web update" on the Salmonella outbreak linked with consumption of Peter Pan and Great Value peanut butter. By that date, the CDC had received reports of 425 cases of food poisoning linked with the outbreak.

Reports had come from 44 states. Approximately 20% of affected individuals had been hospitalized, and no deaths had been reported. 

The outbreak strain (Salmonella Tennessee) has been found in opened jars of peanut butter that were tested after being obtained from individuals who had become ill. All of the peanut butter in question was manufactured at the same facility in Georgia. The FDA and the manufacturer are working together in an effort to learn how the product became contaminated with Salmonella

To learn more about Salmonella food poisoning, please visit the pages of this website  and the blog www.salmonellalawsuit.com. Both sites are sponsored by the Law Firm of Eric H. Weinberg and provide up-to-date information regarding food poisoning outbreaks. 

Mr. Weinberg is part of a team of attorneys currently representing dozens of individuals injured in the recent Arby’s Salmonella outbreak in Valdosta, GA, (please see: "Arbys's Sued in Salmonella Food Poisoning Outbreak in Valdosta, Georgia"), and numerous victims of the recent Peter Pan brand peanut butter Salmonella outbreak (please see: "Team Of Attorneys Files Lawsuit in Peanut Butter Outbreak"). 

If you or a loved one has been affected by the peanut butter outbreak, please read “Client Instructions” at www.salmonellalawsuit.com. If you have a question concerning your legal rights, please contact us toll free at (877) 934-6274. 

To read the complete CDC update, visit: http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dbmd/diseaseinfo/salmonellosis_2007/outbreak_notice.htm#advice

March 7, 2007: Vanzo's, Popular Edwardsville, Illinois, Restaurant, Closed Due to Fears of Salmonella

Five confirmed cases of Salmonella have been reported to the Madison County Health Department since February 28. In a recent press release, the Health Department reported that they are currently investigating an outbreak of Salmonella food poisoning that appears to be associated with Vanzo's restaurant in Edwardsville, IL.

Public Health Administrator, Toni Corona stated that four of the people affected had reported eating at Vanzo’s beginning on February 21. The restaurant has voluntarily closed. 

If you have eaten at this restaurant, and have experienced nausea or vomiting, diarrhea, or fever you may be an outbreak victim. You should contact your health care provider for medical advice. 

The county health department is currently interviewing individuals (both well and sick) who visited Vanzo’s between Feb. 21 and March 6. They can be reached at (618) 692-8954, ext.2, for an interview.  By contacting your local health department you can help public health officials understand how and why this outbreak occurred and help prevent others from becoming ill.  

To learn more about Salmonella food poisoning, please visit the pages of this website.  Sponsored by the Law Firm of Eric H. Weinberg, www.foodpoisoning.com provides up-to-date information regarding food poisoning outbreaks. Mr. Weinberg currently represents dozens of individuals injured in the recent Arby’s Salmonella outbreak in Valdosta, GA, and numerous victims of the recent Peter Pan brand peanut butter Salmonella outbreak. If you have a question concerning your legal rights, please contact us toll free at (877) 934-6274.

March 3, 2007: Risk of Salmonella Contamination in Pennsylvania Raw Milk

Yesterday, purchasers of raw milk from Stump Acres Dairy in New Salem (York County), Pennsylvania, were advised by the Pennsylvania Department of Health to immediately stop drinking the product because of possible Salmonella contamination.

"We are working very closely with the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture to conduct local public health investigations,” said Dr. Calvin B. Johnson, State Health Secretary. “If you have any raw milk from Stump Acres Dairy at home, do not drink the milk and immediately discard it.” 

Two confirmed cases and one probable case of foodborne illness resulting from contact with Salmonella have been reported to the Pennsylvania Department of Health. In each case, the individual had drunk raw milk from Stump Acres Dairy. Milk is described as “raw” if it has not been pasteurized or homogenized. 

Investigations at Stump Acres Dairy by the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture have resulted in three milk cultures that are positive for Salmonella Typhimurium. A positive test also resulted from a milk sample taken from consumers. 

Symptoms of Salmonella food poisoning include diarrhea (sometimes bloody), abdominal cramps, nausea, vomiting, fever, chills, headache, muscle pain, and joint pain. 

Anyone who has become ill after drinking raw milk from Stump Acres Dairy should contact a healthcare professional immediately and inform local and state health officials as well. 

For more information about Salmonella foodborne illness, visit the pages of this website or the blog www.SalmonellaLawsuit.com.

March 2, 2007: Tyson Ground Beef Recall Due to E.Coli Risk

A voluntary recall of 16,743 pounds of ground beef has been announced by Tyson Fresh Meats, a unit of Tyson Foods Inc. According to the USDA, the beef may be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7. 

Routine microbiological sampling by the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) resulted in discovery of the contamination. The ground beef in question was produced on February 16, 2007. Boxes containing six, 10-pound chubs and marked “round, coarse ground beef, 85/15” were shipped to distributors in Idaho, Oregon, Utah and Washington. Labels on the boxes had the establishment number “Est. 9268” and a “best before” date of “03/08/07.” 

Initial symptoms of E.coli O157:H7 infection include severe abdominal cramps and watery diarrhea. The diarrhea may become bloody and can lead to dehydration. Sometimes there are no symptoms at all. There is usually little or no fever. Symptoms generally resolve in 5-10 days, but serious complications may ensue. Children and the elderly are at greatest risk of developing complications. 

Individuals who have questions about the recall should contact Tyson’s Consumer Hotline at (800) 233-6332, weekdays between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m., Central Time. 

To view the complete USDA FSIS press release about the recall, visit http://www.fsis.usda.gov/News_&_Events/Recall_014_2007_Release/index.asp.

 For more information about E. coli food poisoning, visit the pages of this blog and the website www.foodpoisoning.com.

March 1, 2007: Oscar Mayer Louis/Rich Chicken Strip Recall Expanded

Kraft Foods Inc. has now expanded its February 18, 2007, recall of Oscar Mayer/Louis Rich Chicken Breast Strips to include all of the products made at their Carolina Culinary Foods facility because of the possibility of Listeria contamination [see In the News, February 19, 2007]. 

While there have been reported illnesses linked with the initial recall, Kraft decided to expand the voluntary recall after “subsequent evaluation,” according to a news release issued by the company on February 23. The company also noted that they had informed the USDA about this action. 

The recall now applies to all “code dates, sizes, and flavor varieties” of Oscar Mayer/Louis Rich Chicken Breast Strips and Cuts with a “best if used by” date of 28 MAY 2007 or earlier. 

According to the news release, the following products are subject to the recall:

  • Oscar Mayer Louis Rich Chicken Breast Strips with Rib Meat Southwestern Seasoned, Net Wt 6oz, UPC 71871 55720

  • Oscar Mayer Louis Rich Chicken Breast Strips with Rib Meat Grilled,
    Net Wt 6oz, UPC 71871 55721

  • Oscar Mayer Louis Rich Chicken Restaurant Style Breaded Chicken Breast Strips, Net Wt 6oz, UPC 71871 55784

  • Oscar Mayer Louis Rich Chicken Breast Strips with Rib Meat Italian Style,
    Net Wt 6oz, UPC 71871 55723

  • Oscar Mayer Louis Rich Oven Roasted Chicken Breast Cuts with Rib Meat, Net Wt 6oz, UPC 71871 55722

  • Oscar Mayer Louis Rich Chicken Honey Roasted Chicken Breast Cuts with Rib Meat, Net Wt 6oz, UPC 71871 55725

  • Oscar Mayer Louis Rich Chicken Breast Strips with Rib Meat Grilled,
    Family Size, Net Wt 12oz, UPC 44700 02306

  • Oscar Mayer Louis Rich Chicken Breast Strips with Rib Meat Southwestern Seasoned, Family Size, Net Wt 12oz, UPC 44700 02307

Eating food contaminated with Listeria can cause a serious illness known as Listeriosis. Symptoms of the illness include fever, muscle aches, and, occasionally, nausea or diarrhea. If infection spreads to the nervous system, symptoms such as headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance, or convulsions can occur. The disease affects primarily pregnant women, newborns, the elderly, and adults with weakened immune systems. Infections during pregnancy can lead to miscarriage, premature delivery, stillbirth, or septicemia (blood infection) and meningitis in the newborn. 

Signs of illness typically appear from 3- 4 weeks following the consumption of contaminated food. However, symptoms can develop from one week to 90 days after exposure to Listeria

Consumers with questions about the Oscar Mayer recall should contact Kraft Foods at 1-800-308-1841. 

For more information about Listeria food poisoning, visit the pages of this website.  

March 1, 2007: FDA Update on Peanut Butter Recall Highlights ConAgra Contaminated Plant and Recalled Dessert Toppings and Ice Cream

Several state labs have identified Salmonella in open jars of Peter Pan and Great Value peanut butter that had been purchased by consumers. The salmonella found at the ConAgra processing plant and in the open jars matched the Salmonella outbreak strain that had been isolated from consumers who became ill.

The FDA also reported that Peter Pan peanut butter in bulk form was sent from the ConAgra plant to a plant in Humboldt, TN,  for use in the making of dessert toppings and ice creams sold under the Sonic and Carvel brand names.

These products include:

  • Sonic Brand Ready-To-Use Peanut Butter Topping (6 lb. 10.5 oz. cans).

  • This Sonic topping was used in the following Sonic products: Peanut Butter Shake, Peanut Butter Fudge Shake, Peanut Butter Sundae, Peanut Butter Fudge Sundae.

  • Carvel Peanut Butter Topping (6 lb. 10 oz. cans)

  • This Carvel topping was used in the following ice cream products: Chocolate Peanut Butter, Peanut Butter Treasure, Peanut Butter & Jelly, Reese's Peanut Butter Cup Sundae Dasher, and any other custom-made products using Peanut Butter Topping, including ice cream cakes containing peanut-butter flavored ice cream.

  • J. Hungerford Smith Peanut Butter Dessert Topping (6 lb. 10 oz. can; this topping is used by retail outlets and restaurants but is not directly available to the public).

Both Sonic and Carvel recalled these products as of February 16, 2007.

Symptoms of Salmonella food poisoning include diarrhea, (sometimes bloody), abdominal cramps, nausea, vomiting, fever, chills, headache, muscle pain and joint pain.

Anyone who has eaten any of the dessert toppings or ice cream products listed above and has experienced any of these symptoms should contact a healthcare professional immediately. In addition, the FDA recommends informing local and state health officials. The container with the remnants of the suspected product should be sealed, labeled "Do Not Eat," and stored in the refrigerator in case it is needed for testing.

For more information about Salmonella foodborne illness, visit the pages of this blog or the website www.foodpoisoning.com .  

February 28, 2007: To Date, 370 People ill From Salmonella in Peanut Butter Outbreak

According to a CDC announcement, as of February 27, 12 p.m., 370 people have been identified as suffering from food poisoning from Salmonella Tennessee linked with the peanut butter outbreak. Sixty so far are known to have been hospitalized as a result.

The 370 cases come from 42 different states and represent individuals who became ill anywhere from August 1, 2006, through February 16, 2007, with the majority falling ill after December 1, 2006.

Meanwhile, the FDA has concurred with the CDC that Peter Pan and Great Value brands of jarred peanut butter with product codes that start with "2111" are the source of the Salmonella.  The FDA also has said that this is an "ongoing" outbreak because the peanut butter is still in stores and consumers' homes.

Below is the breakdown of Salmonella cases state by state: Alaska - 1, Alabama - 10, Arkansas - 3, Arizona - 5, California - 4, Colorado - 11, Connecticut - 2, Florida - 4, Georgia - 18, Iowa - 7, Illinois -9, Indiana - 15, Kansas - 9, Kentucky - 10, Massachusetts - 6, Maryland - 2, Maine -1, Michigan - 9, Minnesota -5, Missouri -17, Mississippi - 5, Montana - 2,  Nebraska -2, Nevada - 1, New Jersey - 6, New Mexico - 1, New York - 41, North Carolina - 22, North Dakota - 1, Ohio - 9, Oklahoma - 11, Oregon - 2, Pennsylvania - 27, South Carolina - 8, South Dakota - 6, Tennessee - 18, Texas - 16, Virginia - 23, Vermont - 7, Washington - 4, Wisconsin - 6, and West Virginia - 4.

February 24, 2007: Castle Produce Recalls Cantaloupes With Possible Salmonella Contamination

Approximately 2560 cartons of cantaloupes, which may be infected with Salmonella, have been recalled by Castle Produce, a wholesale fruit and vegetable importer. The cantaloupes came from Costa Rica, and have been recalled in California. 

FDA testing showed the presence of Salmonella in cantaloupes that were delivered on February 16, 2007, or after that date to wholesalers in Los Angeles and San Francisco. The cantaloupes were meant for distribution in the western portion of the country. 

The cartons in question contained 9, 12 or 15 cantaloupes and were made of natural brown cardboard with “Tropifresh de Costa Rica” printed in green and orange lettering on them. 

Symptoms of Salmonella food poisoning include diarrhea (sometimes bloody), abdominal cramps, nausea, vomiting, fever, chills, headache, muscle pain, and joint pain. 

Anyone who has become ill after consuming these cantaloupes should contact a healthcare professional immediately and inform local and state health officials as well. 

For more information about Salmonella foodborne illness, visit the pages of this website or the blog www.SalmonellaLawsuit.com

February 22, 2007: Team Of Attorneys Files Lawsuit in Peanut Butter Outbreak

Atlanta, Georgia, February 22, 2007 - A team of attorneys, already working on other Salmonella food poisoning cases in Georgia, today filed a lawsuit on behalf of a client who became ill after eating peanut butter. The client Billy Duren of Homer, Georgia, required medical treatment and hospitalization after he experienced extreme nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, and abdominal pain as a result of eating Peter Pan and Great Value peanut butter.

The suit was filed against ConAgra Foods, Inc., the manufacturer of Peter Pan and Great Value peanut butter that has been linked to a Salmonella outbreak that has affected people in 39 states. All of the peanut butter in question was produced at ConAgra's factory in Sylvester, Georgia, which is under investigation by the FDA.

Attorneys from the firms Childers, Buck, & Schlueter, LLP, of Atlanta, Georgia, and the Law Offices of Eric H. Weinberg, of New Brunswick, NJ are collaborating in an effort to provide quality representation to individuals who have been harmed by exposure to the contaminated peanut butter. Mr. Weinberg is Of Counsel to the firm Cohen, Placitella, & Roth with offices in Philadelphia, PA and Red Bank, NJ.

This same team of attorneys has recent experience filing lawsuits on behalf of victims of Salmonella food poisoning in an unrelated case. They represent a large number of individuals who became ill after eating at a fast food chain in Valdosta, Georgia. The team filed the first case in this foodborne illness outbreak in mid-January, and expects to file dozens more. Mr. Weinberg and Mr. Childers have been contacted by injured parties and other attorneys from all over the country about the peanut butter salmonella outbreak, Mr. Weinberg said.

"We are carefully reviewing each inquiry to determine if we can assist people who believe they have suffered harm from this product," he explained.

Mr. Weinberg has long standing experience in the prosecution of class action and mass tort litigation involving Food and Drug Law. As a Visiting Lecturer at Rutgers University, he has taught about FDA-related litigation for several years.

Mr. Weinberg recently created the website, www.FoodPoisoning.com and the blog, www.SalmonellaLawsuit.com , to provide consumers with much-needed information. The food poisoning site covers the wide range of foodborne pathogens and the illness they cause, as well as related outbreaks and recalls, while the blog focuses specifically on Salmonella, much in the news over the past few months.

Andrew Childers is a partner at Childers, Buck, & Schlueter. The firm has represented thousands of clients in complex litigation involving defective products and has gained a national representation. Mr. Childers will be speaking about food product litigation at an upcoming national conference, and is a frequent guest lecturer for graduate level courses at the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University on the topic of litigation related to public health policy, including foodborne illness litigation.

Chris Placitella of Cohen, Placitella, & Roth is nationally recognized for his litigation and resolution expertise in many significant mass tort cases. He is a leader in the plaintiff's bar and author of numerous papers on complex litigation. Mr. Placitella has served as Lead Counsel in major litigation matters, and has developed LegalView, an internet site providing up to date information for consumers.

The team of attorneys has successfully resolved national cases with global corporations and has obtained over a billion dollars in settlements over the past decade. "In the case of the latest Salmonella outbreak, we plan on moving forward in a careful and thorough fashion," Mr. Childers explained. "We will use all of the resources of the civil justice system to try to answer the questions raised by this recall and the people who have been affected by it."

In addition to analyzing the cases of individuals who have contacted them, Mr. Weinberg explained that his team has adopted a strategy based on identifying the chain of events leading up to the contamination of the peanut butter and working within the legal system to efficiently address the issues and reach a fair and sensible resolution by trial or settlement.

"ConAgra has a significant problem. Mr. Weinberg said, "but they have a significant opportunity to demonstrate corporate initiative and responsibility and the ability to manage crises and weather problems. We have every expectation that they will step up to the plate."

For more information about Salmonella food poisoning, visit the pages of this website and the blog www.SalmonellaLawsuit.com .

February 22, 2007: Earth's Best Baby Food Recalled With Risk of Botulism

Earth's Best Organic 2 Apple Peach Barley Wholesome Breakfast baby food has been recalled. The food may be contaminated with Clostridium botulinum, which can cause botulism. Botulism, though rare, can be fatal.

The FDA has warned consumers not to use the product, even if it does not appear to be spoiled. Instead the food should be destroyed, FDA said. The recall was  initiated by Hain Celestial Group - which had distributed 4,072 cases of the individual jars and 38,298 variety packs - on February 9, and it is ongoing.

The baby food in question is part of Earth's Best "2nd Vegetables, Fruits and Blends" for babies six months old and older. The recalled jars of the UPC code 23923-20223 or 23923-20295. The expiration date is 13 SEP 08 or 14 SEP 08.

Botulism is a serious paralytic illness caused by a nerve toxin, which is produced by the bacterium. The potent toxin blocks nerve function leading to respiratory and musculoskeletal paralysis. The illness is most typically characterized by double vision, inability to swallow, difficulty speaking and inability to breathe. Immediate medical attention is required.

Consumers with questions should contact Hain Celestial Group at 1-800-434- 4246.

For more information about botulism, visit the pages of this website.

To read the complete text of the FDA press release, visit: http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/NEWS/2007/NEW01566.html

February 19, 2007: Over 50,000 Pounds of Oscar Mayer Chicken Breast Strips Recalled For Possible Listeria Contamination

About 52,650 pounds of fully cooked, ready-to-eat, chicken breast strips have been recalled by Carolina Culinary Foods, which is based in West Columbia, South Carolina. The chicken strips are being voluntary recalled because of possible Listeria monocytogenes contamination. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced the recall on Sunday, Feb 18. 

The recalled, six-ounce packages of meat have been identified as: Oscar Mayer/Louis Rich chicken breast strips with rib meat, grilled, fully cooked-ready to eat, with the establishment number "P-19676" inside the USDA mark of inspection on the front. The "use by" date on the back of the package is "19 Apr 2007."

The Georgia Department of Agriculture discovered Listeria in a store sample of the product after microbiological  testing. There have been no reports of illness resulting from consumption of contaminated products, the FSIS said. The FSIS has categorized this recall as Class I, with a "high" health risk.

Eating contaminated with Listeria can cause a serious illness known as Listeriosis. Symptoms of the illness include fever, muscle aches, and, occasionally, nausea or diarrhea. If infection spreads to the nervous system, symptoms such as a headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance or convulsions can occur. The disease affects primarily pregnant women, newborns, the elderly, and adults with weakened immune systems. Infections during pregnancy can lead to miscarriage, premature delivery, stillbirth or septicemia (blood infection) and meningitis in the newborn.

Signs of illness typically appear from 3 - 4 weeks following the consumption of contaminated food. However, symptoms can develop from one week to 90 days after exposure to Listeria.

Consumers with questions about the Oscar Mayer recall should contact Kraft Consumer Response at 800-871-7117.

For more information about Listeria food poisoning, visit the pages of this website.

February 15, 2007: Peanut Butter Recalled For Possible Salmonella Contamination

ConAgra Foods. Inc., is recalling all jars of Peter Pan and Great Value peanut butter with a product code on the lid beginning with the number 2111. The peanut butter may be linked with a Salmonella outbreak that has affected 288 people in 39 states since August of last year. According to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the outbreak is probably ongoing. 

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said this would constitute the first Salmonella outbreak linked with peanut butter. All of the peanut butter in question was produced at ConAgra's factory in Sylvester, Georgia. The FDA, which is warning people not to eat the peanut butter in question, is investigating the Georgia facility.

Of the 288 people who became sick, about 20% were hospitalized. There have been no reported deaths. The majority of cases have been reported in New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Tennessee, and Missouri.

According to the CDC, no more than two cases had been reported each day since the outbreak began in August. The CDC was able to identify the probable source of the Salmonella only recently through an epidemiological study linking the cases. The FDA was given the report on February 13.

According to the CDC, there are about 1.4 million cases of Salmonella food poisoning in the U.S. each year, with more than 500 of those resulting in death. The elderly, infants, and those with impaired immune systems are most likely to suffer severe illness. Symptoms of Salmonella food poisoning include diarrhea (sometimes bloody),  abdominal cramps, nausea, vomiting, fever, chills, headache, muscle pain, and joint pain.

Anyone who has eaten Peter Pan or Great Value peanut butter with the suspect product code and has experienced any of these symptoms should contact a health care professional immediately. In addition, the FDA recommends informing local and state health officials.

For more information about Salmonella foodborne, visit the pages of this website.

To read the FDA news release in its entirety, go to http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/NEWS/2007/NEW01563.html

January 17, 2007: Arby's Sued in Salmonella Food Poisoning Outbreak in Valdosta, Georgia

Attorneys Eric H. Weinberg of New Brunswick, New Jersey and C. Andrew Childers, of Atlanta, Georgia, filed the first lawsuit today against Arby's restaurant on behalf of a woman who was sickened after eating at the fast food chain known for its roast beef sandwiches. Weinberg and Childers are preparing about a dozen additional suits to be filed in the immediate future

According to the attorneys, their clients experienced severe gastrointestinal injuries after eating at an Arby's located in Valdosta, Georgia. Medical tests showed that each of the them had been infected by Salmonella.

The Division of Public Health of the Georgia Department of Human Resources has identified a total of 72 individuals, all of whom were affected by the same strain of Salmonella serotype Montevideo. The outbreak appears to have lasted from August 21, 2006, through November 16, 2006.

The Division of Public Health also noted that a meat slicer and a sample of roast beef from the Arby's restaurant tested positive for Samonella.

"The slicer was in place until October 24, "Mr. Childers said, "Arby's continued using the contaminated slicer for two months with people getting infected the whole time, and they never even warned people that they may get sick from eating at the restaurant."

Seventy of the 72 individuals identified by the Georgia Health Department in the outbreak are Georgia residents. A number of these individuals contacted Mr. Weinberg through his Web site, www.Foodpoisoning.com.

"I'm pleased that we can help people who have been the victims of a food poisoning outbreak," Mr. Weinberg said. "That's why we created the Web site and why we are trying to reach as many people who have been affected as possible."

January 5, 2007: Recall of Over 15,000 Pounds of Franks

On January 5, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service announced that the Gold Star Sausage Co.; based in Denver, CO, is voluntarily recalling 15,514 pounds of frankfurters due to possible contamination with Listeria monocytogenes.

The following products are being recalled by the company

  • One-pound packages of MAVERICK RANCH BEEF FRANKS, 6 SKINLESS FRANKS. "Each package bears a "sell by" date of "2/14/07", "2/21/07", or "2/28/07."

  • One-pound packages of MAVERICK RANCH BUFFALO FRANKS, 6 SKINLESS FRANKS. "Each package bears a "sell by" date of "12/27/06", "1/3/07", "1/10/07", "2/14/07", "2/21/07", or "2/28/07."

  • Five-pound packages of "BEEF FRANKS, PRODUCT CODE MF55-0606-15. "These products were packaged on "12/09/06."

Each package bears the establishment number "EST. 1106" inside the USDA mark of inspection.

To date, there have been no reports of illness linked with these consumption of Gold Star products. The pathogen was discovered through product testing by a non-government laboratory. 

The frankfurters were sold in the following 18 states: Alabama, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, New Jersey, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Utah.

Consumption of food contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes can cause a serious illness known as listeriosis. Symptoms of the illness include fever, muscle aches, and occasionally nausea and diarrhea. If infection spreads to the nervous system, symptoms such as a headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance or convulsions can occur. Symptoms typically appear from 3 - 4 weeks following the consumption of contaminated food. However, symptoms can develop from one week to 90 days after exposure to Listeria.

The disease affects primarily pregnant women, newborns, the elderly, and adults with weakened immune systems. Infected pregnant women may experience only a mild, flue-like illness; however, infections during pregnancy can lead to miscarriage, premature delivery, stillbirth, or septicemia (blood infection) and meningitis in the newborn.

To learn more about Listeria and food poisoning, please visit the pages of this website.

December 13, 2006: Produce and E. coli – Can the FDA Do More?

Dr. David Acheson, Chief Medical Officer at the FDA’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, said it’s time for something to change: “Having illness and repeated outbreaks, especially the ones we've seen in the last couple of months, is clearly unacceptable to everyone.”

The Center for Science in the Public Interest has reported that there were 40 food poisoning outbreaks connected with produce in 1999, while in 2004, there were 86.

This fall, there have been a number of E. coli outbreaks linked with fresh produce. Can the government better protect the food supply and consumers?

This increase may be due to a number of factors, including a higher rate of reporting in these cases and the fact that Americans eat more fruits and vegetables than they did a number of years ago. Regardless of the reason, however, much of the supply of fresh produce is eaten raw, and that can lead to foodborne illness (cooking often destroys bacteria in food).

Consumer advocates would like to see the FDA given more authority to regulate produce. Increased funding, personnel and oversight power may be required, however.

For more information about consumer safety and for links to the FDA and other government agencies, please visit the pages of this website.

December 12, 2006: Green Onions Test Negative in Taco Bell E. coli Infection

Tests carried out by the FDA’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition did not confirm that green onions were to blame for the recent E. coli outbreak at Taco Bell restaurants in several states.

The chain had already removed green onions, also known as scallions, from all 5800 of its restaurants around the country. The Chief Medical Officer at the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, Dr. David Acheson, said that the FDA has not “ruled out any food items, including green onions.”

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there have been 64 reported cases of E. coli infection in all: 28 cases in New Jersey, 22 in New York, 11 in Pennsylvania, 2 in Delaware, and 1 in South Carolina. The CDC noted that the South Carolina resident had eaten at a Taco Bell in Pennsylvania.

A majority of the individuals who suffered from food poisoning during this outbreak were hospitalized (82% according to the CDC). Of those, 13% developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), which threatens the kidneys.

If you think that you are experiencing symptoms related to E. coli infection, you should contact your health care provider or visit your local hospital emergency room.

To learn more about E. coli HO157:H7 and food poisoning, please visit the pages of this website.

December 11, 2006: Number of E. coli Cases Related to Taco Bell Still Growing

“Until Food and Drug Administration oversight is expanded, the most important thing consumers can do to protect themselves and their families is to keep abreast of news about outbreaks and use precautions when handling food.”

Weinberg, whose law firm is currently reviewing the claims of a dozen people who were affected by Taco Bell food during the most recent outbreak, said that he hoped that his website, FoodPoisoning.com, would serve as an informational tool for consumers who were concerned about foodborne illnesses and the state of our food supply.

Weinberg also urged anyone who suspects they may be a victim of food poisoning to see a doctor. Patients should ask their doctors to test stool samples to determine what kind of foodborne bacteria may be involved, he added.

“And, of course, patients should listen to their doctors,” Weinberg said. “Medical professionals will let them know what they need to do to get better.”

December 5, 2006: E. coli Cases in NJ at 25, While NY Is Also Hit

At least 25 cases of E. coli infection have been identified in NJ with links to several Taco Bell restaurants in the central portion of the state. In addition, over a dozen cases have been reported on Long Island in NY. These cases also appear to be linked to Taco Bell restaurants. Health officials have not yet verified a connection between the NJ and NY outbreaks.

Victims in both NJ and NY remain hospitalized, although both of the NJ children diagnosed with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) appear to be improving. The NJ victims range in age, but the majority are under 18 years old.

It has also been reported that two of the employees of the South Plainfield, NJ, Taco Bell restaurant have tested positive for E. coli infection in stool samples, but they have not shown symptoms, according to Middlesex County Public Health Department Director David Papi. Taco Bell has closed the South Plainfield restaurant, as well as four others in Suffolk County on Long Island.

The E. coli strain that has been detected in the NJ and NY cases, E. coli O157:H7, produces a powerful toxin that can cause severe illness. Young children and the elderly may be more susceptible to this type of infection. Symptoms may include diarrhea (often bloody) and abdominal cramps and may appear anywhere from one day to one week following exposure.

If you think that you are experiencing symptoms related to E. coli infection, you should contact your health care provider or visit your local hospital emergency room.

To learn more about E. coli HO157:H7 and food poisoning, please visit the pages of this website.

December 5, 2006: Over 80% of Chicken Tested by Consumer Reports Magazine Found to Contain Bacteria

With approximately 63 cases of E. coli O157:H7 reported in six states since the outbreak linked to Taco Bell was first uncovered in South Plainfield, New Jersey, Central New Jersey attorney, Eric H. Weinberg noted the importance, for consumers, of keeping abreast of food poisoning news.

“The series of food poisoning outbreaks this fall shows how vulnerable consumers are because of the lack of adequate regulation of our food supply,” Weinberg explained.

After testing 525 fresh whole broilers, Consumer Reports found that only 17% were not contaminated with Salmonella or Campylobacter, bacteria that can cause food poisoning in humans.

Not only were these premium brand chickens found to contain bacteria, but several strains were found to be resistant to one or more types of antibiotics. For that reason, some antibiotics might not work in the treatment of food poisoning infections caused by these bacteria, according to Consumer Reports’ Geoff Martin.

Salmonellosis, which occurs when food contaminated by Salmonella bacteria is consumed, is one of the most common foodborne illnesses. Most people infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps within 12-72 hours. Campylobacter is typically contracted by the improper handling of raw poultry or the consumption of raw or undercooked poultry. The illness is typically characterized by diarrhea (often bloody), cramping, abdominal pain, and fever.

According to Consumer Reports, individuals can protect themselves against infection from these bacteria by making sure to thoroughly cook chicken to an internal temperature of 165 degrees F. In addition, consumers should take proper precautions when handling raw chicken, which should always be stored in the refrigerator.

If you think that you are experiencing symptoms related to Salmonella or Campylobacter infection, you should contact your health care provider or visit your local hospital emergency room.

To learn more about Salmonella and Campylobacter, including symptoms and complications of food poisoning resulting from these bacteria and tips on preventing infection, please visit the pages of this website.

 
 

December 4, 2006: E. coli O157:H7 Outbreak Sickens 19 In N.J.

Eleven of the victims were reported to have eaten at a Taco Bell restaurant located in South Plainfield, NJ. The restaurant has voluntarily closed its doors, while the investigation continues.

The Middlesex County Public Health Department (MCPHD) website reports a total number of 19 cases of E. coli infection to date. Seven victims of the outbreak in central New Jersey remained hospitalized, as public health officials worked to discover how and where they had become infected. Two of the patients have developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a serious condition which affects the kidneys.

MCPHD Director David Papi called the outbreak significant. Papi also reported that the restaurant did not show any significant health code violations and that tests were being performed on stool samples taken from available restaurant employees.

Although most strains of E. coli are harmless and can be found in the intestinal tract of healthy humans and animals, E. coli O157:H7 produces a powerful toxin that can cause severe illness. While healthy adults usually recover, young children and the elderly are vulnerable to kidney damage, and in these populations infection can sometimes result in death.

Symptoms of E. coli infection may include diarrhea (often bloody) and abdominal cramps. Symptoms may appear anywhere from one day to one week following exposure.

If you think that you are experiencing symptoms related to E. coli infection, you should contact your health care provider or visit your local hospital emergency room.

To learn more about E. coli O157:H7 and food poisoning, please visit the pages of this website.

 
 
October 10, 2006: FDA Updates Statement on Foodborne E. coli O157:H7 Outbreak in Spinach

With 199 reported cases of E. coli O157:H7 infection resulting from the consumption of raw spinach, the FDA today recommended that: “In order to protect consumers, retailers and food service operators should not sell raw spinach or blends that may contain spinach that were the subject of the recall.

Two elderly women, one in Wisconsin and one in Nebraska, and a two-year-old from Idaho have died during this outbreak. Illnesses have been reported in 26 states.

Investigation into the cause of the outbreak is still ongoing by the FDA, the CDC, the USDA, and the State of California. According to the FDA, all of the spinach implicated in the current outbreak has been traced back to Natural Selection Foods LLC of San Juan Bautista, California. On September 15, 2006, the company initiated a voluntary recall of the products. Four additional companies that received the recalled product from Natural Selections have issued secondary recalls.

For more information about E. coli O157:H7, visit the Eschericia coli page on this website. For an up-to-date list of spinach products that have been recalled, as well as more information about the outbreak, read the FDA news release at: http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/NEWS/2006/NEW01486.html

 
 

October 9, 2006: Foxy Brand Lettuce Voluntarily Recalled by Company

Because of possible E. coli contamination, the Nunes Company, Inc., based in Salinas, California, informed the FDA that it was recalling Foxy brand green leaf lettuce. The company discovered the presence of E. coli in water used to irrigate the lettuce plants.

Although it is not yet known if the strain of E. coli discovered is O157:H7, which can cause life-threatening foodborne illness, or the more common strains that generally do not lead to disease, the FDA commended the company for its cautious approach. At present, there are no reported cases of illness connected with this product.

The FDA has promised to inform the public about the results of ongoing tests on the water supply.

In August 2006, the FDA and the State of California established the Lettuce Safety Initiative designed to increase lettuce safety, improve industry practice and quickly alert consumers about outbreaks.

For more information about E. coli O157:H7, visit the Eschericia coli page on this website. For more information about the Foxy brand lettuce recall and the Lettuce Safety Initiative, read the FDA news release at:

http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/NEWS/2006/NEW01487.html
 
 

October 4, 2006: Tuscan Sun Turkey Sandwiches Recalled by Company Because of Potential Listeria Contamination

Jumbo Foods, Inc., of Mukilteo, WA, has recalled 1360 Tuscan Sun Turkey sandwiches with a production code of 35E. The sandwiches could be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, which can cause life-threatening illness in young children, the elderly or individuals with weakened immune systems. There have been no reported illnesses.

These sandwiches had been distributed to convenience stores in Washington, Oregon and Northern California.

Routine sampling by the Washington State Department of Agriculture discovered that the Tuscan Sun Turkey sandwich contained Listeria. The cause of contamination is under investigation.

The company has advised consumers who bought the sandwiches to return them to the store for a full refund.

For more information about this foodborne pathogen, visit the Listeria page on this website. For the complete press release from Jumbo Foods, visit this FDA web page:

http://www.fda.gov/oc/po/firmrecalls/jumbo10_06.html
 
 
 
In the News
 
December 11, 2006: Number of E. coli Cases Related to Taco Bell Still Growing
With approximately 63 cases of E. coli O157:H7 reported in six states since the outbreak linked to Taco Bell was first uncovered in South Plainfield, New Jersey, Central New Jersey attorney, Eric H. Weinberg noted the importance, for consumers, of keeping abreast of food poisoning news…
More
 
December 5, 2006: E. coli Cases in NJ at 25, While NY Is Also Hit
At least 25 cases of E. coli infection have been identified in NJ with links to several Taco Bell restaurants in the central portion of the state. In addition, over a dozen cases have been reported on Long Island in NY…
More
 
December 5, 2006: Over 80% of Chicken Tested by Consumer Reports Magazine Found to Contain Bacteria
After testing 525 fresh whole broilers, Consumer Reports found that only 17% were not contaminated with Salmonella or Campylobacter, bacteria that can cause food poisoning…
More
 
 
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